Catégorie : CNRS

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
24
Nov
2022
Posted in CNRS

Attempting to challenge the equivalence principle

Launched in 2016, the MICROSCOPE satellite has confirmed with unprecedented precision the equivalence principle, which lies at the heart of Einstein’s general theory of relativity. Two physicists explain the significance of this result.

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
24
Nov
2022
Posted in CNRS

Babi Yar, 1941: An exceptional account of the massacre of Jews in Kyiv

On 29 and 30 September, 1941, 33,771 Jews were executed in Babi Yar, near the Ukrainian capital Kyiv. Shown in French cinemas recently to coincide with the anniversary of the tragedy, the documentary Babi Yar. Context offers a precise, levelheaded acco…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
21
Nov
2022
Posted in CNRS

Ten samples that have marked the history of chemistry

Nestled at the heart of the French national museum of natural history (MNHN) in Paris, the Communication Molecules and Micro-Organism Adaptation (MCAM) laboratory, a joint CNRS-MNHN unit, is home to some precious samples. Over a century old, they have …

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
21
Nov
2022
Posted in CNRS

First-ever physical model consistent with the history of the Earth-Moon system

For the first time, a physical model consistent with observations successfully describes how the tidal force caused by the gravitational pull of the Moon is slowing down the rotation of our planet and increasing the distance that separates it from the …

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
17
Nov
2022
Posted in CNRS

What nanoparticles do to our cells

During the past few years, nanoparticles have been increasingly present in our everyday lives. To gain a better understanding of their health impacts, several studies have focused on the effects they have on our bodies and cells.

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
17
Nov
2022
Posted in CNRS

Science fiction throws light on the present

From robot rebellions to climate apocalypses, science fiction envisions the consequences of our actions and societal choices in a more or less near – and often discomforting – future. In so doing it contributes to the debates on contemporary issues.

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
12
Nov
2022
Posted in CNRS

« Memory is a cardinal value of modern democratic societies »

In 2027 a memorial-museum dedicated to terrorism will open in the western Paris suburb of Suresnes. The historian Henry Rousso, chair of the preliminary project, gives us an overview of the future Museum and Memorial of Terrorism.

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
10
Nov
2022
Posted in CNRS

20 science pictures to catch your eye

The 2022 edition of the LPPI “Proof in Images” competition is here. Discover these winning photos from research, organised by the CNRS with Acfas, its Canadian partner. You can vote for your favourite photo until November 30.

CNRS
30
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

Unprecedented cosmic explosion

The astrophysicist Jean-Luc Atteia explains why the exceptional gamma-ray burst detected in early October could dramatically change what we know about supernovae and black holes.

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
25
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

Global warming in France may be worse than thought

When adapting the IPCC’s method for estimating global warming to the situation in France, scientists have found that the temperatures that can be expected in the country by the end of the century should be higher than thought. They could increase by as…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
25
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

In Botswana, an amazing stream in the desert

Elephants, crocodiles, hippopotami… In Botswana, the Okavango delta is a real paradise for the local fauna during the flood, which lasts several months a year. In this documentary, published in collaboration with LeMonde.fr, a team of French scientists…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
25
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

All too often, the fate of scientists in exile is little known

For more than a century, France has had a tradition of offering asylum to researchers who are forced to flee their home countries, as is the case in Ukraine today. Pascale Laborier of the PAUSE national emergency asylum programme for scientists and art…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
24
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

One software, billions of possibilities

The combination of all the options offered by a software program can reach mind-boggling numbers, with several thousand digits. Research has developed tools to manage this variability as best as possible.

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
21
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

Steganography: when content hides other content

Less known than cryptography, steganography is another means of secretly sending a message by hiding it within other content. CNRS News investigates.

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
20
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

When microrobots manipulate cells

Robots measuring a few dozen micrometres are now capable of grasping, pushing, and even “feeling” cells! These astounding micromachines, designed at the French Institute for Intelligent Systems and Robotics, are already part of biomedical application p…

CNRS
10
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

Realities in the field are weaving the “New Silk Road”

A set of economic and commercial goals, dubbed the “New Silk Road”, is one of China’s flagship development projects. CNRS News takes an analytical look at a network that is more complex and less unilateral in practice than one might think.

CNRS
10
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

Mini-organs with maximum potential

For the past ten years or so, biologists have been cultivating miniature versions of our organs in vitro. By imitating their structure and functions, these so-called organoids open the way to numerous applications, including drug testing, personalised …

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
04
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

Alain Aspect: Shedding new light on light and atoms

The CNRS physicist Alain Aspect has been awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics 2022, along with his colleagues John Francis Clauser, from the US, and Anton Zeilinger, from Austria, « for experiments with entangled photons, establishing the violation of Bel…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
02
Oct
2022
Posted in CNRS

Hunting Martian auroras

Polar auroras are fascinating events that are regularly visible on Earth. Yet do they occur on other planets, such as Mars for example? And if so, how can they be observed? In this report, broadcast in partnership with the French daily Le Monde, scient…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
27
Sep
2022
Posted in CNRS

Walking with our ancestors

How did Australopitecus, Homo habilis and our other ancestors or « cousins » walk? To find out, the biomechanists and computer scientists from the HoBis project are modelling the movements of humans equipped with sensors, as well as baboons, who occasion…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
26
Sep
2022
Posted in CNRS

Meet the world’s fastest microrobot

It is an event that has shaken up the small world of robotics: a nanorobot named MiGriBot (Miniaturized Gripper Robot) just broke the world speed record for object manipulation. Behind this achievement is a French team led by Redwan Dahmouche.

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
13
Sep
2022
Posted in CNRS

Making applications more energy-efficient

It is a genuine environmental problem: mobile applications seem to consume ever more energy. In Lille (northern France), the software science researcher Romain Rouvoy and his team are working to make these software programs more efficient.

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
12
Sep
2022
Posted in CNRS

Art and the ages of life

A philosopher of art and language, Jean-Marie Schaeffer depicts the relationship between the arts and the different ages of life. Examining how the phases of human existence are represented in artworks, he traces the evolution of people’s relations wit…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
08
Sep
2022
Posted in CNRS

When glass and light make sparks

Like the light they conduct, optical fibres span a wide range of applications from telecommunications to medical sensors. On the occasion of the 2022 International Year of Glass, here’s an overview of advances in this field, in which scientists are par…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
26
Août
2022
Posted in CNRS

Artemis: To the Moon and beyond

It’s off to the Moon. 29 August was to mark the beginning of the Artemis space programme. These lunar exploration missions should lead to the return of a human crew to the Moon by 2027. The goal is to settle there for the long term, with the sights set…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
18
Août
2022
Posted in CNRS

AI rates the beauty of tropical fish

Researchers have trained an artificial intelligence (AI) system to assess the visual appeal of 2,400 species of coral reef fish and rockfish. The results show that the fish that we find “less attractive” are those with, collectively, the greatest varie…

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
16
Août
2022
Posted in CNRS

Remediating soil and water with plants

She has just been awarded the 2022 European Inventor Award. Claude Grison, director of the ChimEco laboratory, has developed phytoremediation methods for decontaminating soil and water, using plants. Better still, the metals recovered serve as “green” …

kit de presse Pierre Muzas editeur digital
11
Août
2022
Posted in CNRS

French team tops RoboCup

The French RoboBreizh team won the main event at RoboCup 2022, the world’s most prestigious robotics tournament. It was in the « @Home » category, which focuses on home help, that the Brest team’s expertise in embedded programming made the difference.

22
Juil
2022
Posted in CNRS

The mysteries of the Cosquer cave

As the replica of the Cosquer cave opens its doors to the public in Marseille (southeastern France), Cyril Montoya, the cave’s scientific director, tells us about this marvel of prehistory, which is endangered by rising sea levels, and details the many…

20
Juil
2022
Posted in CNRS

The Internet, a disinformation highway?

« Be there. Will be wild! » exhorted Donald Trump on Twitter before the invasion of the Capitol on 6 January 2021, which was revisited in mid-June by an investigative committee. The former President had cried electoral fraud. Have fake news and the manip…

18
Juil
2022
Posted in CNRS

The little-known powers of our gut microbiota

With its 100,000 billion bacteria, viruses and other microorganisms, our intestinal microbiota is not just essential to our digestion. Research is now revealing its increasing influence on the immune system, growth, and conditions such as depression, d…

18
Juil
2022
Posted in CNRS

The Vel d’Hiv Roundup: Shedding new light on a French crime

Previously unexamined sources and archives have shed new light on what exactly happened in the streets of Paris 80 years ago during the Vel d’Hiv Roundup of 16-17 July, 1942. An analysis with historian Laurent Joly, author of a recently-published book …

12
Juil
2022
Posted in CNRS

« The James Webb Space Telescope images are extraordinary »

Today the American (NASA), European (ESA), and Canadian (CSA) space agencies released the first colour images and spectroscopic data from the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). Coordinator of one of the first observation programmes involving the telesc…

12
Juil
2022
Posted in CNRS

Bigscience: a new language model for all

Open source and covering forty-six different languages, BigScience is a new artificial intelligence heavyweight offering natural language processing. Claire Gardent, a CNRS research professor at the LORIA and winner of the CNRS Silver Medal, who also s…

07
Juil
2022
Posted in CNRS

Jean-Marie Tarascon, energy prodigy

Jean-Marie Tarascon, Chair of Solid State Chemistry and Energy at the Collège de France, is the recipient of the 2022 CNRS Gold Medal, one of France’s highest scientific distinctions. He is world-renowned for his discoveries of new battery components w…

05
Juil
2022
Posted in CNRS

A Fields Medal for Hugo Duminil-Copin

The French mathematician is one of four winners of the most prestigious award in his discipline, announced this morning live from the International Congress of Mathematics (ICM). He is distinguished for his work in the field of probability, a rapidly e…

01
Juil
2022
Posted in CNRS

Gender power relations in mammals are less rigid than thought

Among mammals, what are the mechanisms that govern the relations of power between males and females? A review paper by an international scientific consortium challenges a number of preconceived notions: in many mammal societies there is an alternation …

24
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Françoise Gaill, the voice of the oceans

A specialist in deep-sea ecosystems, marine biologist Françoise Gaill takes action on an international scale to protect the oceans through the Ocean & Climate Platform.

24
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Greening data centres

Faced with the massive increase in the volume of information processed by data centres, Datazero research projects have been striving since 2015 to develop algorithms that can optimise their energy consumption and accessibility. The computer science re…

23
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

The laboratory comet

The aim of several scientists is to trace the changes of a comet during its journey through the Solar System by reproducing the thermal and light characteristics of the cosmos in the laboratory. This will enable them to understand where the elements th…

22
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Famed paleontologist Yves Coppens has died

The co-discoverer of Lucy, who joined the CNRS in 1956, died this month at the age of 87.

21
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Construction, a future worksite for mechanics

How can a building’s structure be optimised in order to adhere to exacting security standards, all while reducing its environmental impact? This is the challenge faced by scientists in the highly-active field of mechanics.

20
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Plants adopt new strategies to survive in cities

Whether between paving stones, on the edges of pavements, or along walls, wild plants are surreptitiously settling in cities. They can even adapt to the urban environment through genetic evolution, explains the ecologist Pierre-Olivier Cheptou.

16
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

The CNRS 2022 Innovation Medal laureates

Jacques Marteau, Pierre Nassoy, Denis Spitzer, and Céline Vallot are the four laureates of the CNRS 2022 Innovation Medal. This distinction honours personalities whose exceptional research work has led to significant technological, economic, therapeuti…

12
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

IA leads the charge against multiple sclerosis

Artificial intelligence may enable earlier diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis, an incurable disease that attacks the central nervous system. This could improve the efficacy of treatments designed to slow its progression.

09
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Biomechanics off to a flying start in BMX racing

BMX racing, which has been an Olympic sport since 2008, is the cycling event that requires to apply the greatest force to pedals. Researchers at the Pprime Institute were approached to help competitors and their trainers better assess their movements a…

23
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Feeling virtual reality at last

« Imagine stepping into a virtual world, walking through an orchard. You want to pick an apple, and when you grab it, you can feel it in your hand, as if it were real. Transforming the world of virtual reality into a truly tactile experience is the aim …

23
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Sustainable cities to fight climate change

One of the five main objectives of the EU’s Horizon Europe research programme is to see 100 cities attain carbon neutrality by 2030. Christophe Ménézo, a specialist in photovoltaic solar energy, explains how research is taking up the challenge.

23
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Saving our water resources

Restoring our oceans, seas, and coastal and inland waters by 2030 is the goal of the Horizon Europe programme’s Mission Starfish 2030. Agathe Euzen, deputy scientific director of the CNRS Institute of Ecology and Environment tells CNRS News about what …

22
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Climate-related risks are still denied

What impact do the IPCC reports have? Do society, the media and politicians take enough notice of them? Do climate sceptics still have significant influence? CNRS News talked to Valérie Masson-Delmotte, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group I, which assesses …

12
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Black hole Sgr A* unmasked

Scientists were aware there was a huge object hidden at the centre of the Milky Way, and they also knew it had no hair. The EHT collaboration has now obtained the very first image of Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Galaxy.

10
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Latin graffiti are precious witnesses of the past

Between the 7th and 16th centuries, anonymous pilgrims and other travellers left behind traces of their presence throughout the eastern Mediterranean region, where the walls of sacred sites are emblazoned with thousands of Latin inscriptions to this da…

09
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Astronomers discover micronovae

Based on observations by the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope, a team of astronomers has discovered a new type of stellar explosion. A million times less powerful than novae and much more short-lived, these explosions have been dubb…

06
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Forgotten dates in Europe’s history (4/4)

To round off our series, taken from the book “Chroniques de l’Europe” published by CNRS Éditions, join Belgian women workers on strike for equal pay, find out how America’s Internet profited from the invention of the World Wide Web in a European organi…

05
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

When cyber-attacks target hardware

Hackers and researchers are taking increasing interest in hardware attacks on electronic devices. These attacks can circumvent security protocols, track Internet users, or simply destroy machines.

26
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Tracking radioactive barrels in the Atlantic

Between the 1950s and 1990s, some 200,000 barrels of radioactive waste were dumped by European nations into the North East Atlantic. Scientists are set to assess the condition of the barrels today and study their effects on surrounding ecosystems.

26
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Dragons, mammoths and giant wolves: what do the animals in “Game of Thrones” tell us?

As we await the release of the prequel “House of the Dragon”, scheduled for this coming autumn, here are the answers to three questions that you might not have thought to ask about the cult television series “Game of Thrones”. What glacial period does …

19
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

The gilthead bream faced with climate change

How much longer will marine life be able to withstand rising temperatures? Find out more about how scientists are trying to determine the impact of global warming on the physiology and behaviour of the gilthead sea bream.

18
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Resistance in Ukraine is also digital

Faced with the blocking of numerous websites and control of social media orchestrated by the Kremlin, Ukrainians and Russian anti-war activists are resisting through decentralised messaging services and distribution lists. An overview by Francesca Musi…

14
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Water management: should we be “environmental plumbers”?

Faced with growing disruption to the water cycle, leading to severe flooding and drought together with increasing water pollution, humans are struggling to adapt. But are ever-greater water storage and control of river flows really the right solutions?…