Catégorie : CNRS

24
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Françoise Gaill, the voice of the oceans

A specialist in deep-sea ecosystems, marine biologist Françoise Gaill takes action on an international scale to protect the oceans through the Ocean & Climate Platform.

24
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Greening data centres

Faced with the massive increase in the volume of information processed by data centres, Datazero research projects have been striving since 2015 to develop algorithms that can optimise their energy consumption and accessibility. The computer science re…

23
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

The laboratory comet

The aim of several scientists is to trace the changes of a comet during its journey through the Solar System by reproducing the thermal and light characteristics of the cosmos in the laboratory. This will enable them to understand where the elements th…

22
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Famed paleontologist Yves Coppens has died

The co-discoverer of Lucy, who joined the CNRS in 1956, died this month at the age of 87.

21
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Construction, a future worksite for mechanics

How can a building’s structure be optimised in order to adhere to exacting security standards, all while reducing its environmental impact? This is the challenge faced by scientists in the highly-active field of mechanics.

20
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Plants adopt new strategies to survive in cities

Whether between paving stones, on the edges of pavements, or along walls, wild plants are surreptitiously settling in cities. They can even adapt to the urban environment through genetic evolution, explains the ecologist Pierre-Olivier Cheptou.

16
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

The CNRS 2022 Innovation Medal laureates

Jacques Marteau, Pierre Nassoy, Denis Spitzer, and Céline Vallot are the four laureates of the CNRS 2022 Innovation Medal. This distinction honours personalities whose exceptional research work has led to significant technological, economic, therapeuti…

12
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

IA leads the charge against multiple sclerosis

Artificial intelligence may enable earlier diagnosis of Multiple Sclerosis, an incurable disease that attacks the central nervous system. This could improve the efficacy of treatments designed to slow its progression.

09
Juin
2022
Posted in CNRS

Biomechanics off to a flying start in BMX racing

BMX racing, which has been an Olympic sport since 2008, is the cycling event that requires to apply the greatest force to pedals. Researchers at the Pprime Institute were approached to help competitors and their trainers better assess their movements a…

23
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Feeling virtual reality at last

« Imagine stepping into a virtual world, walking through an orchard. You want to pick an apple, and when you grab it, you can feel it in your hand, as if it were real. Transforming the world of virtual reality into a truly tactile experience is the aim …

23
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Sustainable cities to fight climate change

One of the five main objectives of the EU’s Horizon Europe research programme is to see 100 cities attain carbon neutrality by 2030. Christophe Ménézo, a specialist in photovoltaic solar energy, explains how research is taking up the challenge.

23
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Saving our water resources

Restoring our oceans, seas, and coastal and inland waters by 2030 is the goal of the Horizon Europe programme’s Mission Starfish 2030. Agathe Euzen, deputy scientific director of the CNRS Institute of Ecology and Environment tells CNRS News about what …

22
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Climate-related risks are still denied

What impact do the IPCC reports have? Do society, the media and politicians take enough notice of them? Do climate sceptics still have significant influence? CNRS News talked to Valérie Masson-Delmotte, Co-Chair of IPCC Working Group I, which assesses …

12
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Black hole Sgr A* unmasked

Scientists were aware there was a huge object hidden at the centre of the Milky Way, and they also knew it had no hair. The EHT collaboration has now obtained the very first image of Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the heart of our Galaxy.

10
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Latin graffiti are precious witnesses of the past

Between the 7th and 16th centuries, anonymous pilgrims and other travellers left behind traces of their presence throughout the eastern Mediterranean region, where the walls of sacred sites are emblazoned with thousands of Latin inscriptions to this da…

09
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Astronomers discover micronovae

Based on observations by the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope, a team of astronomers has discovered a new type of stellar explosion. A million times less powerful than novae and much more short-lived, these explosions have been dubb…

06
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

Forgotten dates in Europe’s history (4/4)

To round off our series, taken from the book “Chroniques de l’Europe” published by CNRS Éditions, join Belgian women workers on strike for equal pay, find out how America’s Internet profited from the invention of the World Wide Web in a European organi…

05
Mai
2022
Posted in CNRS

When cyber-attacks target hardware

Hackers and researchers are taking increasing interest in hardware attacks on electronic devices. These attacks can circumvent security protocols, track Internet users, or simply destroy machines.

26
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Tracking radioactive barrels in the Atlantic

Between the 1950s and 1990s, some 200,000 barrels of radioactive waste were dumped by European nations into the North East Atlantic. Scientists are set to assess the condition of the barrels today and study their effects on surrounding ecosystems.

26
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Dragons, mammoths and giant wolves: what do the animals in “Game of Thrones” tell us?

As we await the release of the prequel “House of the Dragon”, scheduled for this coming autumn, here are the answers to three questions that you might not have thought to ask about the cult television series “Game of Thrones”. What glacial period does …

19
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

The gilthead bream faced with climate change

How much longer will marine life be able to withstand rising temperatures? Find out more about how scientists are trying to determine the impact of global warming on the physiology and behaviour of the gilthead sea bream.

18
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Resistance in Ukraine is also digital

Faced with the blocking of numerous websites and control of social media orchestrated by the Kremlin, Ukrainians and Russian anti-war activists are resisting through decentralised messaging services and distribution lists. An overview by Francesca Musi…

14
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Water management: should we be “environmental plumbers”?

Faced with growing disruption to the water cycle, leading to severe flooding and drought together with increasing water pollution, humans are struggling to adapt. But are ever-greater water storage and control of river flows really the right solutions?…

10
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

The evolution of the Covid-19 virus remains unpredictable

Two years to the day after the start of the pandemic, and after the successive appearances of different variants, what is the situation regarding the evolution of the SARS-CoV-2 virus? An update by Samuel Alizon, a specialist in the modelling of infect…

05
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Initial results of the Notre Dame scientific renovation project

We followed the researchers of the joint CNRS / Ministry of Culture scientific project, who have been hard at work since the disaster on 15 April, 2019. Their mission: to unravel the secrets of the 12th- and 13th-century builders as an aid in restoring…

02
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Innovation and emotion form part of heritage preservation

Whether it is imperilled by the passage of time or by bombardment, as in Ukraine today, the world’s cultural and architectural heritage must be protected. The role of science is key in heritage preservation, especially the latest digitisation technique…

01
Avr
2022
Posted in CNRS

Forgotten dates in Europe’s history (3/4)

In this third episode in our series, made up of excerpts from the book “Chroniques de l’Europe” published by CNRS Éditions, we retrace the long journey of European women to the ballot box, discover that robots originated in the theatre, and take a look…

24
Mar
2022
Posted in CNRS

How social networks manipulate public opinion

From election campaigns to the war in Ukraine, social networks are now used on a massive scale to influence public opinion. David Chavalarias, director of the Politoscope project and author of a newly released French-language book entitled Toxic Data, …

23
Mar
2022
Posted in CNRS

“Putin’s power is wielded through a network of repressive social controls”

Even though the Russian president appears to be increasingly isolated, it would be impossible for him to run the country alone, as Françoise Daucé, a specialist on governmental-societal relations in Russia, points out. The expert, who heads the CERCEC …

21
Mar
2022
Posted in CNRS

Sculpting matter

In order to sculpt their materials on the nanometric scale, when each speck of dust or infinitesimal vibration can compromise their work, physicists need cleanrooms that are insulated from all types of disturbance. An insight into the Centre for Nanosc…

16
Mar
2022
Posted in CNRS

Oblivion, the second death of extinct species

With so many species endangered or already extinct, scientists are pointing to the importance of keeping their memory alive in the collective consciousness. According to the ecologist Franck Courchamp, forgetting their existence could compromise the ef…

15
Mar
2022
Posted in CNRS

Notre-Dame, a vessel of stone and iron

Notre-Dame Cathedral is the setting for a large-scale scientific study aimed at penetrating the building’s secrets and helping with its restoration. This film shows how researchers extract information from stone and iron in order to understand how medi…

07
Mar
2022
Posted in CNRS

The second NanoCar Race is off to a good start

The world’s smallest car race will return to Toulouse (southwestern France) on 24-25 March. Eight international teams will be at the starting line for the competition. Christian Joachim, a CNRS research professor and the event organiser, provides detai…

06
Mar
2022
Posted in CNRS

Guillaume Cabanac tracks fake science

“Nucleic corrosive” for “nucleic acid”. “Counterfeit conscience” in place of “artificial intelligence”. These are some of the “tortured” phrases that the CNRS researcher Guillaume Cabanac tracks in scientific publications in order to identify those tha…

06
Mar
2022
Posted in CNRS

Forgotten dates in Europe’s history (2/4)

In this second episode in our series, we meet the first women admitted to university, hark back to the plague and the cordon sanitaire, and set sail for the poles, where science was taking its first tentative steps.

28
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

Act while solutions exist, the IPCC urges

Climate change has done more damage than expected, but options still exist for moving forward, explains the CNRS biologist Camille Parmesan, who helped draft the “Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability” report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate C…

28
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

Act while solutions exist, the IPCC urges

Climate change has done more damage than expected, but options still exist for moving forward, explains the CNRS biologist Camille Parmesan, who helped draft the “Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability” report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate C…

24
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

Cécile Charrier, a head full of synapses

The biologist Cécile Charrier, winner of the Irène Joliot-Curie “Young Female Scientist” award in 2021, has been trying for several years to unlock the secrets of the neural circuits in our brains.

23
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

Choosing a vaccination strategy to deal with Covid variants

How can the appearance of a new variant that will affect the efficacy of vaccination against Covid be prevented? New models provide a clearer understanding of this phenomenon, in order to anticipate it and adapt our vaccine strategies.

23
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

The thousand and one facets of glass

The United Nations declared 2022 the International Year of Glass, whose official launch took place on 10 and 11 February in Geneva, Switzerland. Researcher Daniel Neuville provides a brief yet eye-opening overview of the huge range of science-related i…

21
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

A century after BCG, a global forum tackles tuberculosis

A century after the first inoculation with BCG, tuberculosis continues to exert its devastating effects; the vaccine offers poor protection for adults and the bacilli are displaying increasing resistance to antibiotic therapy. From 22 to 25 February 20…

17
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

The Antarctic: an icy laboratory

Because of its geographical location, pristine expanses and animal populations, the Antarctic has been a prized location for scientific research over the past few decades. Severely impacted by global warming, it is now also a vital environment for stud…

16
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

A tremendously costly error

Computer scientist and mathematician Jean-Paul Delahaye explains why Bitcoin’s electricity consumption is a major flaw that should result in it being banned or replaced by less energy-intensive cryptocurrencies. 

16
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

Order within disorder

What if there was order within the disorder that surrounds us? Researchers are examining phenomena across all scales in order to explain the dynamics of apparently chaotic or disordered systems, such as clouds, stock prices, and deep neural networks.

13
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

Forgotten dates in Europe’s history (1/4)

In the first episode of our series on European history, we take a look at the movements advocating the abolition of the death penalty, the execution of Europe’s last witch, and the struggle for an eight-hour working day.

08
Fév
2022
Posted in CNRS

The metaverse at the crossroads of illusions

An inevitable evolution… or just a fad? The computer scientist Michel Beaudouin-Lafon provides an uncompromising analysis of the metaverse, the virtual world that some digital companies are pinning high hopes on.

28
Jan
2022
Posted in CNRS

Does the Enlightenment still shine in the 21st century?

The Age of Enlightenment is in the spotlight at the French pavilion at Expo 2020 in Dubai. The 18th-century movement generated a surge of technical and scientific progress in Europe, but did it also pave the way for the unbridled exploitation of scienc…

27
Jan
2022
Posted in CNRS

Autonomous cars hit French roads

For a few days last year, scientists tried a self-driving car on the roads of Rambouillet (Paris region). The goal was to analyse its behaviour in relation to other road users, and to test its entry into roundabouts. Results from a life-size experiment.

27
Jan
2022
Posted in CNRS

Putting nature at the heart of society to fight climate change

More than a million animal and plant species are today threatened with extinction worldwide. To make things worse, this biodiversity loss is now being irremediably accelerated by climate change. The researcher Ignacio Palomo points out that nature can …

19
Jan
2022
Posted in CNRS

Europe set to fight cancer

The European Union aims to reduce by 3 million the number of deaths from cancer on the continent between now and 2030. As France took over the EU presidency on 1 January 2022, we review the situation with Yvan De Launoit, deputy scientific director in …

19
Jan
2022
Posted in CNRS

Europe set to fight cancer

The European Union aims to reduce by 3 million the number of deaths from cancer on the continent between now and 2030. As France took over the EU presidency on 1 January 2022, we review the situation with Yvan De Launoit, deputy scientific director in …

17
Jan
2022
Posted in CNRS

The unforeseen acceptance of deepfakes

Rapid improvements in deepfake technology, which modifies a person’s appearance or voice in real time, call for an ethical review at this still early stage. Researchers in cognitive science shed some light on the public’s perception of this phenomenon….

13
Jan
2022
Posted in CNRS

Art and archaeology are the new frontiers for AI

Algorithms are increasingly reliable for identifying the content of images, but so far have not been able to evaluate their aesthetic or emotional value. A new horizon that artificial intelligence is now beginning to explore.

12
Jan
2022
Posted in CNRS

Artificial genomes offer a promising lead

This is research that has not gone unnoticed: scientists have created extremely realistic artificial genomes as a result of their work on artificial neural networks. Flora Jay, who coordinated these efforts, explains.

11
Jan
2022
Posted in CNRS

Covid-19: What have we learned from the pandemic?

From the Neolithic period to modern times, from cattle plague to SARS-CoV-2, the emergence of new infectious diseases has often been the result of changes that mankind has inflicted on the environment. This documentary shows how biologists, anthropolog…

09
Jan
2022
Posted in CNRS

Oxytocin, from love potion to medicine

Oxytocin appears to be involved in several types of attachment, including love. Marcel Hibert explains its chemical and biological mechanisms and the therapeutic hopes it inspires, notably in the treatment of autism.

17
Déc
2021
Posted in CNRS

Sea monsters at the time of the dinosaurs

Over 60 million years ago, superpredators such as ichthyosaurs, plesiosaurs and mosasaurs roamed the seas. But what exactly were these reptiles, which are often incorrectly referred to as “marine dinosaurs”? CNRS News asked three of the authors of “La …

16
Déc
2021
Posted in CNRS

Urban birds, stressed birds

Birds are an increasingly rare sight in our cities. In this report, researchers from the Centre for Biological Studies of Chizé (CEBC) investigate the problems – noise, light, lack of food – that affect various species of birds in urban areas, and seek…

15
Déc
2021
Posted in CNRS

Data storage: the DNA revolution

Two seminal revolutionary declarations, now stored and encapsulated in DNA, are joining the French national archives (Archives nationales). Behind this project is the DNA Drive technology developed by the researchers Stéphane Lemaire and Pierre Crozet.

14
Déc
2021
Posted in CNRS

SPIRAL2, the atom factory

In the French city of Caen, GANIL’s new heavy ion accelerator, SPIRAL2, has completed commissioning. The custom-built linear accelerator is even more powerful than its predecessor and will pave the way for the exploration, with unparalleled precision, …